Our sales agent Arjan has been helping to lead the charge introduce tin to Europe and from custom patterns for the Heineken head office to the corner store; it’s been catching on like wildfire. Here are some of our favorite tin installations in Europe, from restaurant to retail.

Milk Bar – Kiev

Launched just two months ago amidst a country in crisis, Milk Bar is a welcome addition to the Ukrainian restaurant scene. A café and coffee shop in the morning, it turns into a trendy dinner establishment with liquor license at night. Retro furniture and an eclectic ambiance encourages hanging out long into the day. Pioneering the idea of “somfort foods,” big portions of simple foods, the concept started as a pastry shop and evolved into full-blown meals. Their patterned floors are whimsical, complimenting the tin counter and milk bottles used as décor.

Mike Bar Russia

Bar Paul – Amsterdam

A gathering place for everyone from creative, hipsters and punks to mothers and fathers, Bar Paul is a no-fuss drinking establishment with three floors and a terrace. Dark, dimly lit and decked out in warm colors, the rich copper tiles accent the deep wood tones decorated with animal heads to give it a rustic feel.

Bar Paul Amsterdam

Polpo – London

Touted as the “hottest table in town,” Polpo is a collection of bars throughout the UK. Officially defined as a bàcaro, a Venetian word meaning a humble restaurant with quality, young wines, it has been a Michelin Guide Bib Gourmand winner 3 years running. Described as “scruffy, earthy and cool,” owner Russell Norman has been touted as “the pioneer of the recession-era restaurants,” leading the charge on moderately priced, uncomplicated meals. They chose tin to emulate a New York gritty feel, but treat the tiles themselves with sulphuric acid, caustic soda, acetone, and even leave them out in the rain for periods to rust to make them look damaged and decayed.

Polpo London